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Puppet on a String does the business for the UK at Eurovision

After years of nearly winning, the United Kingdom finally pulls its socks up and takes the Eurovision prize.

Sandie Shaw winning the 1967 Eurovision Song Contest.
Bare-footed Sandie Shaw wins Eurovision.

Puppet on a String

Sandie Shaw

United Kingdom

1967

47 points (winner)



WHAT ABOUT THE CONTEST?

Coming from Vienna in Austria, the stage is a little formal, with a slightly distracting twirling mirrored backdrop and some dangerous steps down to the front of the stage.


Eurovision old school.


Please stop smiling in the audience and only clap in moderation, if you don’t mind.

AND THE GROUP (OR ARTISTE)?

Sandie Shaw (pictured).


Yes, we know, THE Sandie Shaw, all barefoot and giving it everything, despite the very real threat to her artistic credibility (and feet), as that big old mirror twirls behind her right shoulder.


WHAT ABOUT THE SONG?


Oompah, oompah, fairground twinkly-winkly camp; a marching band doing a two-step, some blathering lyrics about being a prisoner of love and the first proper outing for the infamous British Eurovision banger. Not so much written, as bolted together in an almost pleasing pastiche of a real song, to Win, Win, Win!


ANY GOOD?

It's a little odd.


Shaw famously refused to sing Puppet on a String for years after the contest (being a serious artist, and all that), though she does sing it now and rather surprisingly, it still works its bizarro magic.


AND IT CAME WHERE?


Well, colour me happy, but we have a winner!


Puppet on a string not only took the prize (with 47 points, beating Ireland into second place with 22 points) but it also went on to be one of the great Eurovision standards.


Just the sound of that fairground opening is enough to set feet tapping.