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Lulu goes full Boom Bang-a-Bang

You can see why Lulu had to be prodded onto the stage to sell this song for the UK and why she didn't want to do so.

Lulu performaing at the 1969 Eurovision Song Contest.
Lulu belts it out for the UK.

Boom Bang-a-bang

Lulu

United Kingdom

1969

18 points (first)



WHAT ABOUT THE CONTEST?

In 1969 the Eurovision Song Contest was broadcast from Madrid after Spain’s controversial win the previous year with no one's favourite entry La, La, La.


Austria declined to enter, as fascist Spanish dictator General Franco still ruled the country, and it was forbidden for contestants to dance during the show. In addition, Salvador Dali created the advertising and promotional campaign for the contest.


How absolutely bizarre and how very, very Eurovision.

AND THE GROUP (OR ARTISTE)?

Poor Lulu. A credible singer, a light entertainment TV star in her own right and with credible chart success behind her, you can see why she had to be prodded onto the stage to sell this song for the United Kingdom.


And why she didn’t want to do so.


WHAT ABOUT THE SONG?


Nobody likes this entry, even though it wins on the night. Sort of.


The epitome of what Eurovision became ridiculed (and celebrated) for in the years that followed; Boom Bang-a-Bang is a sing-along waltzer, with a machine programmed lyric designed to work everywhere: “My heart goes boom bang-a-bang, boom bang-a-bang when you are near, boom bang-a-bang, boom bang-a-bang loud in my ear.”


Why would Lulu not want to sing this song?


Great bassline, though.


ANY GOOD?

No. It’s strange in a bad way, repetitious, and helped shape semi-successful British Eurovision entries for years to come.


It does have a fantastic bass line, however.

Have I mentioned the great bassline?


AND IT CAME WHERE?